Tag Archives: dc comics

READY PLAYER ONE Drops 1st Trailer

By Tom Holste

Jul. 24, 2017

Over a year ago, I wrote an article about the upcoming film adaptation of the novel Ready Player One by Ernie Cline. To my surprise, it’s become the most “Liked” post I’ve made, and I’ve gotten more follows on my blog due to that than anything else!

For those unfamiliar with the source material, the novel is about a young man living in a future Earth where everything has deteriorated so much that the only escape is into a virtual reality “OASIS” where people can be whoever they want to be, and can have whatever they want to have, including their favorite pop culture icons. So, for instance, if you want to look like Batman and fly the Millennium Falcon, you can do that.

Cline’s novel is clever and fast-paced, but I figured with all the different intellectual properties from different companies mentioned, this film would be impossible to make. When Steven Spielberg stepped into the director’s chair, though, the film’s development really started to move forward. Spielberg is one of the few people in Hollywood that could make such a project happen; in fact, he already got multiple companies to work together for the animation extravaganza Who Framed Roger Rabbit (which he produced and Robert Zemeckis directed)That film met with such success and acclaim, it’s not surprising that studios would be willing to trust his instincts with this film as well.

(Also worth noting is that, when the novel came out, we hadn’t seen such universe-jumping franchises as The LEGO Movie or LEGO Dimensions yet, which is why I found such an onscreen mashup unlikely at the time.)

With such a high level of enthusiasm for the project, it’s only natural to share the first trailer for the film here:

A few random thoughts:

–While many different properties are indeed featured in the clips, naturally Warner Bros. put their properties front and center in the trailer. WB owns The Iron Giant, perhaps the licensed character that gets the most screen time in the trailer; DC Comics-owned characters (Harley Quinn and Deadshot) walk through one scene; and at another point Freddy Krueger (whose films were released through Warner-owned New Line Cinema) is also clearly visible.

There are cameos from the DeLorean from Back to the Future (Universal) and the van from The A-Team (Universal again, although Fox did the movie adaptation), but they’re basically blink-and-you’ll-miss-it moments. (I’m not saying that the trailer doesn’t feature many non-Warner properties, just that these stood out to me more, and I actually had to go and look up articles to find out what was in the trailer.)

Non-Warner Bros. characters and stories may still feature heavily in the completed film; I recall that the 1983 MGM-owned WarGames featured significantly into the plot, and I believe that Voltron was present in the climax, as were some TIE Fighters. But it’s not surprising that the marketing focuses more on the in-house stuff.

Also, I expect that any non-Warner property that’s not absolutely essential to the plot (or anything that they couldn’t get the rights to) will get substituted with something else in the final film.

–Is it just me, or is it really weird to see Freddy Krueger in a Steven Spielberg movie? It’s not wrong or anything; it just seems odd for some reason that I can’t put my finger on.

–It’s been interesting to see the fairly recent shift in storytelling tastes. For a long time, crossovers within a company or on a TV network were common. There were a ton of Hanna-Barbera projects where Yogi Bear met up with Scooby-Doo and the Flintstones and other H-B characters; Magnum P.I. wound up on an episode of Murder, She Wrote; Paul Reiser’s character from Mad About You once showed up at the apartment of Kramer from Seinfeld; and so on.

As time went on, these crossovers began to feel more and more like lame cash grabs without much story justification. And so a lot of TV shows and movies only took place within their respective fictional universes, with creators going out of their way to define why other characters wouldn’t work within the consistency of the universe. (In an interview about the first live-action Scooby-Doo movie, screenwriter James Gunn said that Grape Ape shouldn’t be able to casually exist next to Scooby: “This Mystery Inc. might freak out if they saw Grape Ape and try to pull his head off, thinking it was a mask.”)

However, possibly due to the rise of social media, where we’re used to scrolling through our feed and seeing a Lord of the Rings meme followed by a SpongeBob meme, audiences seem ready to accept crossovers again, and if the reception to Cline’s novel — as well as the aforementioned LEGO productions — is any indication, the idea even gets them very excited.

–Since John Williams ran into scheduling conflicts, composer Alan Silvestri has stepped up to the plate. As much as I love Williams’ work, Silvestri is pretty exciting to have on board. Silvestri’s work includes Back to the Future, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Forrest Gump and The Avengers. Since we know at least the DeLorean appears in the film, expect Silvestri to work in a reference to this and possibly other franchises in the music.

–The movie looks visually stunning, and I actually probably would be excited for this film based on the story alone even if it wasn’t this huge mashup (although that is a huge selling point for me). And that really is the best way to go: The movie needs to function as a satisfying story in and of itself, or eventually the novelty will wear off.

Anyway, this first trailer is a rousing success!

Advertisements

Yabba-Dabba-Doo or Don’t?

Part 3 of my series “Everything Old is Old Again”

By Tom Holste

Feb. 17,2016

When talking about reboots the other day, I mentioned that DC Comics is planning on rebooting several Hanna-Barbera properties in their comics later this year. (Warner Bros. owns both DC Comics and the entire old Hanna-Barbera catalog.)

The new Scooby-Doo is set during a zombie apocalypse. (The new comics will not affect the continuity of DC’s other Scooby-Doo books that it currently produces, or the current TV series Be Cool, Scooby-Doo.) The Flinstones is being turned into a series with more realistic artwork. Wacky Races is getting a post-Mad Max apocalyptic makeover. And Johnny Quest and many C-list superhero characters from the H-B universe are being brought together Marvel’s Avengers-style for a series called Future Quest.

Scooby-Apocalypse

This is not a drill, people! This is also, apparently, not a joke.

 

Personally, I’m torn about the updates. On the one hand, several  friends have aptly described some of the updates as being very “DeviantArt.” For those not in the know, DeviantArt is a site where fans post their artwork that usually has a strange or unusual take for a character or fandom. It’s all considered to be in good fun, but not something that should be done on a serious professional level by the rights holders.

scooby_DeviantArt

An actual contribution on DeviantArt — and again, as far as I know, not a joke.

An apocalyptic Scooby-Doo and Wacky Races both indeed come off as very DeviantArt, and not in a good way. The new Flinstones art is kind of creepy-looking. Future Quest looks the most promising to the fans of the classic material, but even at that, did the world really need the return of such characters as Frankenstein Jr. and the Impossibles?

Flintstones-new

It never USED to bother me that Barney didn’t have pupils…

Often attempts to update classic characters feel very forced and awkward, and look very dated within a decade. “Hey, let’s bring back some beloved cartoon characters, only this time they’re all babies / teenagers / skateboarders / ninjas!”

However, having said all of that…

When it comes to Hanna-Barbera, many of the productions weren’t artistic masterpieces to begin with. I have nostaglic fondness for them as much as anybody else, but are they really untouchable works of art? In fact, many of them were cheap, formulaic knockoffs of other, more popular things in the culture at the time.

For instance, it will come as a surprise to absolutely no one that The Flintstones (an excellent series) was a knockoff of The Honeymooners, and when other fads came along, the creators were more than happy to jump on the latest trend. And I’m not even talking about the bizarre spinoffs featuring the Thing from The Fantastic Four or the Shmoo from Li’l Abner. Within the classic original 6-year run, there was a Bewitched-centered episode, an Addams Family takeoff, and a recurring alien character called The Great Gazoo that might have been based on My Favorite Martian.

Yes, a show that already featured cavemen with modern appliances didn’t think it too strange to throw an extraterrestrial into the mix.Yes, a show that already featured cavemen with modern appliances didn’t think it too strange to throw an extraterrestrial into the mix.

Great-Gazoo

Yes, a show that already featured cavemen with modern appliances didn’t think it too strange to add an extraterrestrial to the mix.

Again, though, everybody already knows about The Flintstones. But did you know that Scooby-Doo was a combination of an old radio show called I Love Mystery and the sitcom The Dobie Gillis Show? That’s right, Freddie was based on Dobie, and Shaggy was a copy of Bob Denver’s beatnik character, Maynard G. Krebbs.

Dobie_and_Maynard

Now that you’ve seen it, you’ll never be able to unsee it.

Dobie Gillis itself has largely fallen out of the public eye; does the current version of its imitation still need to follow in those footsteps? If a supernatural series for youngsters were indeed being designed from scratch today, wouldn’t its more likely inspiration be The Walking Dead and other zombie movies and TV shows?

As for The Flintstones, drawing them in a more realistic style (however uncanny it is) at least made me recognize some of the wonderful absurdity of the show all over again (“So that’s what it would look like if somebody actually had a pet dinosaur”). This franchise has been languishing since the terrible live-action movies of 1994 and 2000; an ill-conceived direct-to-video animated movie inexplicably featuring WWE wrestlers failed to ignite any interest last year. This new project may not be what The Flintstones needs, but these characters clearly need some kind of a fresh approach.

I had a bigger problem with Loonatics Unleashed from a few years ago, which bafflingly reimagined the Looney Tunes characters as futuristic superheroes. In the first place, the original Looney Tunes are brilliant and still hold up as high-water marks in animation and comedy. So there was no need to change the premise so radically. In the second place, while I can see at least a tenous connection between Scooby-Doo and modern spooky shows like The Walking Dead, there is nothing at all about Looney Tunes that makes me say, “These characters need to be fighting aliens.”

So there’s at least potential for some of these projects to turn out really good. It’s not a definitive truth, of course, but I’m going to keep an open mind. After all, Frankenstein Jr.’s phone hasn’t rung for a while. I think he’s probably happy just to be working again.

 

Everything Old is Old Again

Part 1: The Not-Really-Reboots

By Tom Holste

Feb. 15, 2016

The subject of reboots and rehashes has been coming up a lot lately. And unfortunately, the problem is that when it comes to reboots, to quote Inigo Montoya from The Princess Bride, “I do not think that word means what you think it means.”

What a reboot actually means is ignoring the previous continuity and starting completely starting over from scratch. Think of it like rebooting your computer. It’s a chance to start fresh, so that the creators and audiences aren’t weighed down with trying to remember tons of minautue to enjoy the new story, or perhaps to undo some creative decisions that the fans disliked.

DC Comics rebooted their fictional universe in the 1980s with their Crisis on Infinite Earths mini-series, and they keep rebooting every 10 years or so. When it comes to movies, Batman Begins was a reboot that dismissed the movies with Michael Keaton and company. And while 2006’s Superman Returns was a sequel to the Christopher Reeve movies, 2013’s Man of Steel is a full reboot that ignores the earlier movies.

Transformers-the-Movie

TRANSFOMERS actually needed a reboot, since the cartoon concluded in the far-flung future of…the year 2006!

So, basic concept here: If a particular piece of entertainment continues or references the established continuity, it’s a sequel or prequel, but if the old continuity is thrown out and the filmmakers treat the new story as if it were the first-ever story, then it’s a reboot.

Simple, right? Apparently not to the thousands of journalists out there covering every entertainment news story on the planet.

For example, back in November, ABC fired Bob Kushnell, the producers of the new Muppets sitcom, and brought on Kristin Newman, citing declining ratings and fan dissatisfaction. Despite the fact that the characters and premise were staying the same, every news organization said that ABC was “rebooting” the series.

Then, after David Bowie’s passing in January, news surfaced that the Jim Henson Company was “rebooting” Labyrinth, which ignited a firestorm of protests from fans of the original movie. The screenwriter currently working on the project (Nicole Perlman) had to quickly take to Twitter to explain that the movie would be a sequel or some kind of follow-up story set in the same universe, not a reboot. Furthermore, Perlman explained that she’s been working quietly on the project since 2014, so this wasn’t just a cheap cash-in on Bowie’s death.

Silver-Chair

“THE SILVER CHAIR reboots Narnia!” uninformed bloggers say. “Who will play the new Goblin King? … Oh, wait. That’s LABYRINTH.”

But the trend continued. Mark Gordon, the producer of the Narnia movies, indicated that the next film The Silver Chair would not require audiences to have seen the other movies (or to have liked them), since the story had so many new characters in it. This is in accordance with the original book, which was written over 50 years ago. Nonetheless, every news article called it a reboot of the series. The only way to reboot this series would be to make The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe again, or possibly to go with the prequel story The Magician’s Nephew.

However, when DC Comics announced new comic-books based on Hanna-Barbera characters that reimagined them from modern eyes, and when Universal pictures announced the desire to do a new Battlestar Galactica series that likely has nothing to do with either of its previous incarnations, not one article that I read used the word “reboot” for either property, even though in this case that’s exactly what they are! Excuse me a minute while I pound my head on the desk.

Ow. Sorry about that. Now where was I?

Mind you, it doesn’t bother me as much when bloggers write something informally and refer to everything as reboots. But when professional websites with paid writers can’t tell the difference (or choose not to, since the word “reboot” is apparently great for clickbait), that’s when I get annoyed.

At any rate, even the sheer number of sequels and other follow-ups has gotten out of hand. But so has this article, so I’ll have to continue my thoughts on the subject in my next column.

For an excellent analysis of the Silver Chair confusion, here’s the Narniaweb podcast on the subject.

 

SUPERGIRL is Usually Pretty Super

By Tom Holste

Feb. 13, 2016

Anyone else in the blogosphere really enjoying this series?

I’m liking it quite a bit. In particular, I think Lisa Benoit is terrific in the title role, and Callista Flockhart’s character Cat Cora is an interesting mix of mentor and antagonist. I’m also liking the bits and pieces of DC Comics history that are interwoven into the show.

Supergirl

“I can handle any villain you throw at me…but please, don’t make me watch SUPERMAN IV: THE QUEST FOR PEACE!”

The problem with Supergirl as a character that’s plagued her since her inception is that she’s always in Superman’s shadow. It’s great to have female heroes, but she wasn’t an original character created from scratch; she’s “Superman, but this time it’s a girl.” Audiences have always been more interested in Superman stories overall. And previous TV and movie adaptations have not been able to overcome this problem.

So the producers wisely built this conflict directly into the show itself. The whole series is about Kara trying to prove to herself and to others that she has value, too, and that she contributes significantly to the universe she lives in. And the series is showing us that she indeed does.

The show isn’t perfect, certainly. The love triangle is kind of cliched, and considering that Winn is handsome, charismatic and available, Kara’s rejection of him makes little to no sense. He should have at least some flaw to explain her lack of interest.

Also… (Major SPOILERS follow.)

 

 

Still with me? Okay.

…I was very happy when Cat found out Kara’s secret identity. Considering how smart Cat is supposed to be, she needed to figure it out quickly, and considering how often Kara misses work, I thought it would be useful if her boss understood the reasons. But, no, this great plot development got hand-waved away in the very next episode, which was extremely disappointing. And it was very convenient that he just happened to meet a shape-shifter right before she needed one (although the reveal of Martian Manhunter itself was pretty great).

There have also been a number of plot holes. For instance, in “Bizarro”: If Kryptonite made Bizarro stronger, why did she suddenly fly away from the fight she was winning? And when Kara’s words didn’t convince Bizarro that she was wrong, why did she apologize in the end after she was subdued?

Furthermore, as of “For the Girl Who Has Everything,” the DEO has now captured Maxwell Lord, someone who’s as famous as Donald Trump or Bill Gates. Cat runs a major news organization in the city where Lord lives. How is it that no one is covering the news that Maxwell Lord is suddenly missing? Even though they wouldn’t know about the DEO, his sudden disappearance should be generating massive headlines.

Also, how did Lord not have security cameras on his office so that someone could prevent potential kidnappers? And why didn’t Alex wear something to cover her face when she broke into the office so that no one could identify her?
Didn’t I say I liked this show? Yes, I do. It’s got a breezy, light tone that I thoroughly enjoy, while it builds up to a more epic storyline. I enjoy all the actors, and both the heroes and villains on this show are interesting to watch. It may not always fire on all cylinders, but when I does, I enjoy it more than Agents of SHIELD or Agent Carter, which is saying something.

I’m glad that the show is being brought into the larger DC television universe. I didn’t catch Flash or Arrow when they started, and now I’ve got a good reason for going back and watching them!

Supergirl-Flash-Arrow

“We should call ourselves the ‘Justice Club’! … How about the ‘Superpals’? … OK, we’ll work on it.”